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Minimalist Lifestyle Blog
  • RingWord.com vs. Phone Numbers - Which One do You Need?
  • Tracy Freese
  • corporate minimalismentrepreneurminimalist technologystart up
RingWord.com vs. Phone Numbers - Which One do You Need?

Because I live my life 100% online, I pay attention to things like domain names. When I see a good one it jumps out at me. Last year I discovered a local jeweler (in small town Iowa ) had the domain name www.TheDiamondStore.com and was struck by how expensive that must have been to purchase. The owner told me that in the late 1990's his friend told him about this thing called the Internet. His friend was apparently a scientist of some type and helped the jewelry store owner purchase his domain for pennies and build a website before anyone had ever uttered the word "Netscape!" 

Today's blog features a concept just like the one I outlined - getting in at the beginning of something HUGE. I was recently introduced to a business model that could ignite an Internet revolution and turn online and offline advertising on their heads. While the co-founder of RingWord.com likens his website's value proposition to phone number replacement, I would also offer that it also feels a lot like claiming a domain name and the race to grab the good ones before they are gone. 

"I was listening to the radio at work which can be entertaining, but annoying. They tend to repeat phone numbers 3 times for ever 30 second spot. It's irritating and it doesn't work. We don't think in numbers, we think in words or pictures. We have all heard of 800-flowers and vanity phone names, but they are so few as they are limited by the phone digits. So, I thought of a Ring Word, a take on Ring Tones, but more valuable for companies advertising on the radio, TV or display advertising. 

 

Then I realized that people don't remember each others phone numbers either. If it's not in your address book on your smart phone, it doesn't exist. See RingWord.com/Tom for an example. What about Facebook? Most people don't publish their phone numbers on Facebook, too many trolls, goblins and ghouls out there. On RingWord you can encrypt your phone number, email address etc., so Trolls and bots can't steal it and add you to their database, or prank phone call you. You can leave a hint, for your friends.

It's easy, and your first RingWord is free." -Tom, Co-founder RingWord.com

RingWord.com features the ability to claim, buy, sell and auction your ring words in an open market. So last night I set-up my own ring word for free using the exclusive Home of Wealth code listed below. When it's time to renew, I will receive an email. If I wish to keep my ring word I pay $14 each year. Liken this concept to claiming your phone number in a phone book but its 100% online and you will never experience "Hey, is this Jodie?" at 3AM on a Saturday. 

I claimed the word "SEO" which stands for search-engine-optimization and is a primary function of my business. Thus, whenever someone reads or hears the ring word "SEO" they would drop by www.RingWord.com/SEO and find me! The idea is that the ring word website would become as woven into our social fabric as reaching for a telephone book or typing in "google." I really had a fun time with this entire business model and felt like it was one more way small fish entrepreneurs are disrupting big fish capitalism. 

Claiming your ring word couldn't be easier and it took five minutes to register. The RingWord.com owners want everyone to sign-up and start using this service and are throwing free ring words at you! Drop by the site and use code FIRSTYEARFREE to get your first ring word at no cost for the first year. They will drop you an email when it's time to renew. An annual payment of $14 and the ring word is yours to do what you want with it. Forget to renew? It goes back into the ring word universe and can be claimed by someone else...maybe your competition. Get over there today and grab your first ring word for FREE before the other guy grabs it before you!

  • Tracy Freese
  • corporate minimalismentrepreneurminimalist technologystart up